EXCLUSIVE AND OPINION: Ranking the 20 Cities for Amazon’s Second Headquarters (PART 1)

By Nick Baum

SUNDAY – 5/6/18

Ever since Amazon has announced a new second headquarters, hundreds of cities across North America raced to prove why they were best for the company to move its new location. Out of the over 200 bids, came just 20 finalists, ranked. (List goes from least likely to most likely)

20. Washington D.C. – D.C. definitely has some advantages, as having a headquarters in the capital of America as well as an up and coming tech hub can give power to the company. However, take into account the amount of space available in DC as well as high taxes and costs.

19. Montgomery County, Maryland – Montgomery County has a strategic location for Amazon, being squeezed in between both D.C. and Baltimore. Unlike DC, Baltimore didn’t make it to the finalists so the fact that the county of about a million people can rival major cities with their education and transportation proves promising. However, similarly to DC, Montgomery County has very high taxes, and not enough space in the densely populated area.

18. Nashville, Tennessee – Nashville is a center for innovation in the Tennessee area, with many companies flocking to the innovation center. However, the city’s lack of education as well as proximity from any major transportation lines proves to be hard on the city’s bid.

17. Indianapolis, Indiana – Similar to Nashville, Indianapolis is the center of the regional area around, with many companies and important programs in Indiana being centered there. However, the lack of an economy as well as a bigger rival just north of them, Chicago, can prove strong against the city.

16. Newark, New Jersey – Being the smallest city on the list, Newark is the underdog in the battle for Amazon, but has the capabilities. The city is connected to railroad stretching through the east coast, has an airport a short distance from downtown, and is also home to Amazon’s Audible, an audio-book company, as well as having education and tons of space in the city. However, the small size of the city, negative publicity due to its very high 7 billion dollar bid, as well as close proximity to two other candidates, New York and Philadelphia, can prove to be costly for the Brick City.

15. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania – The western Pennsylvanian industrial powerhouse definitely has a shot at Amazon, but will be hard to deliver. Having lots of space in terms of both warehouses and factories, Pittsburgh can deliver. However, the lack of innovation as well as startups or new programs in the city can prove difficult.

14. Raleigh, North Carolina – Raleigh has a stable and well city that has low taxes and can always welcome a new company. However, if you take into account the lack of skills or transportation to other cities, let alone the fact that its the biggest city for miles, could be costly.

13. Boston, Massachusetts – Boston is a stronghold in the region, being the center for finance and commerce in New England while holding a fierce rivalry with New York City. Boston has strong innovation and leadership in the region, as well as strong culture and transportation for Amazon. Despite all of this though, Boston has a high tax rate, and has seen a fair share of corporations leave the city, but Boston still has a small shot at delivering.

12. Los Angeles, California – The City of Angels is dominant in the southwest, boasting lots of companies and startups throughout the region. The city has a population of 4 million, has multiple universities and has multiple airports. Despite all of this though, high taxes and homelessness could be a setback.

11. New York City, New York – The Big Apple might be the largest city in the country, attracting companies big and small and having world class universities and transportation, but similarly to Los Angeles, high taxes as well as space and many regulations in New York might damage the city’s chances, but New York still has a good shot.

The bottom 10 will be featured on Part 2.

Sources: Wall Street Journal, Tech Crunch, CNBC

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Nick

Hey, I'm head of The Daily Nick. Other interests include soccer, photography, and arguing with people who disagree with me.

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